People’s History Books in 2021

Here is another reason to look forward to 2021 — new people’s history books.

We highlight below a few upcoming 2021 titles and invite you to events we are hosting for The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks: Young Readers Edition (January 11) and How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America (May 10).

Help us introduce these people’s history books and many more to teachers in 2021. Donate today.

The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks: Young Readers Edition

By Jeanne Theoharis and Brandy Colbert

In story after story, Jeanne Theoharis and Brandy Colbert breathe life into the rebellious Mrs. Rosa Parks, a fighter for justice who will intrigue and inspire young people. And for all of us who want to teach honestly about Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement, this is an essential resource.

Register for the book launch with the author and pre-order the book.

How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America

By Clint Smith

An examination of how monuments and landmark tell myths or truths about the central role of slavery in U.S. history and its legacy today.

Register for an online people’s history class with the author.

Teacher Unions and Social Justice: Organizing for the Schools and Communities Our Students Deserve

Edited by Michael Charney, Jesse Hagopian, and Bob Peterson

An anthology from Rethinking Schools with more than 60 articles documenting the history and the how-tos of social justice unionism.

Unspeakable: The Tulsa Race Massacre

By Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by Floyd Cooper

This children’s picture book centers the history of the thriving Black community of Greenwood before the 1921 Tulsa Massacre.

Monumental: Oscar Dunn and His Radical Fight in Reconstruction Louisiana

By Brian K. Mitchell, Barrington S. Edwards, and Nick Weldon

A graphic novel about Oscar James Dunn, a New Orleanian who became the first Black lieutenant governor and acting governor during Reconstruction.

The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century

Edited by Gabrielle Foreman, Jim Casey, and Sarah Patterson

Well before the founding of the NAACP, tens of thousands of Black leaders organized state and national conventions across the United States. This volume of essays tells the story.

Separate No More: The Long Road to Brown v. Board of Education

By Lawrence Goldstone

The long history of the road to Brown v. Board for young adults, including Ida B. Wells, NAACP, the Springfield “Riot,” Charles Hamilton Houston, the Howard University Law School, Thurgood Marshall, and many more key people, legal cases, and institutions.

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